Category: Estate

Going through probate can be a lengthy, expensive and stressful process, but the attorneys at Bunch & Brock make that process easy and straight-forward for their clients. If you’re wondering whether all assets have to pass though probate, the general answer is no. The things that are typically required to pass through probate are assets that have a paper title in the deceased name. Some of these things might include a house, land, vehicle, bank accounts and investment accounts. But with effective and knowledgeable estate planning, most people can avoid the headaches of a long, […]

New Year’s is a perfect time to take a snapshot of your future goals, including evaluating the status of your estate plan.  Whether you already have an estate plan that needs to be updated or you are just starting to explore the idea of creating a will, the beginning of a new year is the perfect time to tackle your estate planning checklist. Your estate planning checklist should contain most or all of the following documents: Will Durable Power of Attorney Advance Healthcare Directive Healthcare Power of Attorney Trusts Guardianship Designations Beneficiary Designations Letter of Intent […]

In the view of some people, estate planning is easy — have an attorney draw up a will, leave what you want to whom you want, and hope for the best. However, there is far more to it than that. Through estate planning, you can achieve many goals. You can give to charity, make arrangements for your care if you become unable to make decisions for yourself, and, perhaps most importantly, make it easier for your loved ones to carry out your wishes after you have passed away.  Here’s how… Power of Attorney One of […]

No one enjoys the idea of losing their independence and having to rely on someone else. However, when used properly, a power of attorney can ensure that a trusted person is handling your financial affairs when you’re not mentally or physically capable of doing so yourself. Powers of attorney are highly customizable and can be drafted to address individual situations. Initially an inexpensive way for someone without a lot of money to do some estate planning, a power of attorney has evolved into a fairly standard document. If you’ve been entrusted by someone else to act […]

At its best, divorce is a difficult process. At its worst . . . well, we’ve all heard the horror stories. While the term is a legal one for dissolving a marriage, its emotional aspects are usually harder to work through than its legal ones. Spouses who are divorcing tend to focus on immediate concerns such as who will stay in the marital home, who will have primary custody of the kids and who will pay the credit card bill. It’s easy to overlook long-term financial plans, but doing so can leave you in a […]

Remember when it was time to buy a new car and you spent time poring over models, colors, dealers, options, prices, incentives and safety ratings? Investing in a new vehicle is a big deal, and any large purchase, whether for a product or a service, should involve comparison shopping. Although not a fun purchase like a car or a big-screen TV, paying for your funeral in advance can bring peace of mind – to you and your loved ones. The truth of the matter is, in death, as in life, someone has to pay for […]

Most people labor under the assumption that life will follow a “normal” path, stretching from school to retirement with a chapter for marriage and kids. But real life is full of choices and twists of fate. There are no guarantees except death and taxes. Consider what would happen to your loved ones if you died suddenly and unexpectedly. On the other hand, what would happen if you lived to an old age? Making estate planning decisions from your death bed comes with its own set of challenges. Putting a plan in place now and having […]

If you don’t have a will, you’re not alone. According to a survey released last year by Rocket Lawyer, 64 percent of Americans have not taken the time to draft one. Further, the survey revealed that just about half of married Americans with children had no will, while more than 80 percent of single Americans with children did not have one. And the reasons likely sound familiar: 57 percent said they “just haven’t gotten around to making one.” 22 percent felt that making a will wasn’t urgent. 17 percent didn’t think they needed a will. […]