Month: February 2017

  The word “audit” tends to strike fear (or at least mild apprehension) in the heart of every taxpayer, but the Internal Revenue Service isn’t the only government entity that can use its official powers to investigate citizens and their paperwork. The United States Trustee Program (USTP), part of the Department of Justice, oversees the administration of corporate and consumer bankruptcy cases. One of its specific responsibilities is “taking legal action to enforce the requirements of the Bankruptcy Code, and to prevent fraud and abuse.” When the Bankruptcy Code was overhauled a decade ago, it gave the […]

Collection lawsuits can be costly and time-consuming, so many creditors look for alternative debt repayment. They will repossess the collateral, stop providing the service, or accept reduced payments. While not all creditors turn to the courts to collect on an overdue debt, they do retain that right and may choose to pursue legal action if the debtor has any income or assets. Many creditors sell defaulted debt to collection agencies for pennies on the dollar, figuring that some payment is better than none at all. The collection agencies take on the headache and the possibility […]

They say timing is everything, and that is certainly true when it comes to bankruptcy. What you own and what you owe must be listed in the schedules that you file with the bankruptcy court. But what about income or assets that come your way while your case is pending? Whether anticipated or not, the federal Bankruptcy Code requires the reporting of any funds that a debtor becomes entitled to within 180 days of the date he or she filed for bankruptcy. That means inherited money or property becomes part of the bankruptcy estate if […]